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How to eat less plastic

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How to eat less plastic

How to eat less plastic

Many of us are eating, drinking and breathing tiny little pieces of plastic on a regular basis.

Microplastics are a byproduct of the more than eight billion tons of plastic produced, mostly since the 1950s.

They're ending up in our food, our water and the air.

Consumer Reports reveals more about how this may be affecting our health and the steps we can take to eat less plastic.

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How to eat less plastic

Many of us are eating, drinking and breathing tiny little pieces of plastic on a regular basis.

Microplastics.

Are a byproduct of the more than 8 billion tons of plastic produced, mostly since the 19-50's.

They're ending up in our food, our water and the air.

Consumer reports reveals more about how this may be affectg our health and the steps we can take to eat less plastic.

Leah linschied reports.

((pkg)) (v/o) plastic.

(natsot: bag snapping open) (v/o) .

Is everywhere.

Bags, bottles and packaging.

For everything from hand lotion to dish soap to coffee pods.

(natsot: machine closing) (v/o) but plastic has become more than just a part of our lives.

It has unwittingl become part of our diet, too.

Chyron: kevin loria, consumer reports health editor (sot) "as use all of this plastic, little tiny fragments break off of the water bottles or plastic bags or wrappings.

We call these little fragments microplasti -- they're five millimeters at their largest but they can be much smaller, they can be microscopic.

And they end up in the food that we eat, the water that we drink and even the air that we breathe."

(v/o) according to early results from a forthcoming study from the university of new castle in australia, researchers estimate the average person consumes up to 5 grams of of a credit card!

The plastics industry association said in a statement to consumer reports, that research has not shown "significant human health impacts" from microplastics, but this is something that requires further study.

(sot: kevin loria) "experts that we've spoken with say that it's very likely there are going to be at least som health effects.

It's possible, for example, that ingesting microplastics might increase our exposure to some other chemicals that we know are in some plastics.

Chemicals that we know have harmful health effects."

(v/o) some of these chemicals have been linked to a variety of potential health problems, including reduced fertility, obesity, organ damage, developmental delays in children and even cancer.

So how can you eat less plastic?

(natsot: running water) (v/o) first, start by drinking tap water.

Microastic levels in bottled water can be twice as high as tap.

Using the microwave?

(natsot: microwave beeping) (v/o) don't heat food in plastic.

And -- eat more fresh food.

It may expose you to fewer concerning chemicals than wrapped, packaged and processed food.

Another place you may be ingesting plastic?

-- household dust is a big source of both microplastics and chemicals like




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