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Midmorning With Aundrea - July 29, 2019

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Midmorning With Aundrea - July 29, 2019
Midmorning With Aundrea - July 29, 2019

Break away from your everyday with Aundrea Self!

Today, plastic surgeons in the UK are warning about the possible dangers of breast implants for women.

We'll take a look.

And we'll take a sneak peek at the hottest toys that will be hitting stores soon before the holiday season.

And a treasure trove of millions of photographs chronicling the African-American experience will soon be available in museums including the Smithsonian.

>> that does it for us.new chno new technology could help you keep find the stuff you misplace all the time.

We'll show you.

And, the hottest holiday toys.

Yes, it's time to talk about it.

Plus, inside a historic archive of photos.

Midmorning starts right now.

Plasc plastic surgeons in britain are warning about the dangers of breast implants as more women are reporting pain and extreme fatigue.

Cindy pom has the story.

I'm terrified naomi macarthur recorded this video just weeks before getting surgery to remove breast implants.

The london-born 28 year old says they made her so tired she couldn't even do simple things.

Writing with a pen was that tiring.

Nats..working out... she couldn't write let alone work out like she used to as a personal trainer.

- courtesy victoria derbyshire the amount of pain and suffering that i had to go through.

And going to clinics, and hospitals and doctors, and saying to them, "i'm so ill" a them saying it's not due to the implants but macarthur didn't believe it - so she did her own research.

She found other women online with the same symptoms. patients call it breast implant illness.

It's poorly recognized to be perfectly honest.

They haven't proven that silicone causes direct harm to the body.

But there are not very many studies.

In the u-s - the fda is also looking into breast implant illness....saying on their website: researchers are investigating these symptoms to better understand their origins.

One us manufacturer says it takes this matter seriously and that patient safety is its number one priority.

I'm about to go down and i'm scared.

After living with the implants for four years, macarthur decided to remove them in march.

I'm alive she says she felt better as soon as she woke up from surgery.

I had completely blood shot eyes all the time, and my eyes are white now.

Macarthur says the experience has been a life lesson.

Nat sot - macarthur what's the most important is long term health.

Nats..working out now...she says she's stronger than ever.

Cindy pom, cbs news, london.

About 400- thousand women get breast implants in the us every year - most for cosmetic reasons.

The fda is requiring us manufacturers to keep tabs on women for up to 10 years after receiving the implants.

Many of those patients should be aware of this warning.

Allergan, a major producer of breast implants is stopping the sale and distribution of its átexturedá products, amid growing links to a rare and deadly cancer.

Anna werner reports.

"had we known of a risk, yeah we would have never opted to have an implant."

Lory daddario had already beaten breast cancer.

Then, in 2017, two years after getting textured implants following reconstructive surgery, she says her right breast suddenly grew to three times its normal size.

"the swellin was so rapid and so pronounced that i knew, i just knew that it wasn't normal."

She underwent a battery of tests.

The results?

Cancer, which developed around her breast implants.

"that was tota shock // even now, sometimes i go, 'how can that be?

How can you get cancer from something you're putting in your body?'" darrio's implants were manufactured by the company mentor.

She is one of a growing number of women being diagnosed with the rare disease known as breast implant- associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, associated with the textured form of implants.

The fda on wednesday asked a different company, allergan, to recall its textured implants, linking them to "&significan patient harm, including death..."

Of 573 lymphoma cases, 481 are "attributed t allergan implants," an the fda also reports that 12 patients who ádiedá had allergen implants.

Allergan told us it is voluntarily recalling its biocell textured implants and tissue expanders worldwide as a "precaution.

Aw: is one of the theories that the surface irritates & inflames the tissue ep: that's one theory aw: because of the surface being rough?

Ep: that's right in march, we spoke with texas breast surgeon dr. elisabeth potter, who even then, refused to use áanyá textured implants.

I won't place them.

I-- and actually my practice we-- i often say it-- this doesn't pass the sister test.

Anna werner: doesn't pass the sister test, i.e.

You wouldn't-- dr. elisabeth potter: that's correct.

Anna werner: --give it to your sister you're notgonna give it to your patients.

Dr. elisabeth potter: that's correct.

Daddario, now 58, is cancer free.

But she says the recall does ánotá go far enough.

"one person wit this lymphoma is one too many.

The fda is not recommending women without symptoms remove the implants because of the risks.

But dr. potter tells us many patients want them out -- and she has removed them for 35 women.

Mentor stands by its textured implants, and says the cancer is "rare" with i implants.

Aw, cbs new, nyc if you love ice cream but can't have dairy, good news -- you have plenty of options these days.

Frozen desserts made from non- dairy milk have gone mainstream -- and can taste as delicious as the real thing.

But are they good for you?

Reid binion has more information in this report.

Who doesn't love ice cream -- whether you crave it on a hot summer day or during a rainstorm.

While it might not be the healthiest option, most agree it's refreshing.

But what about those dairy- free and vegan options?

Those must be healthier, right?

Well, not necessarily.

Non-dairy frozen desserts feature good-for-you- sounding alternatives, like soy milk, almond milk, or conut milk.

Many offer lower calories per serving than their dairy counterpart -- and could have less saturated fat, which raises l-d-l, or bad cholesterol.

But not all dairy-free alternatives are the same.

Some brands have just as many calories and saturated fats, especially those made with conut milk.

The amount of sugar in these non-traditional versions vary as well.

Some pack up to half the recommended daily limit.

There are also two things missing from non-dairy ice cream -- calcium and protein that come from milk.

But as with most food choices there are pros and cons.

And let's be honest -- we aren't eating ice cream for its nutritional value, anyway.

For today's health minute, i'm reid binion.

If you're prone to misplacing your keys, purse or other items, you might want to invest in a set of bluetooth trackers.

But as cnet's kara tsuboi explains, these inexpensive tags have a wide variety of creative uses.

Bluetooth trackers are small tags that help you find your lost things.

Attach them to your most frequently misplaced items and then a corresponding app can help you locate them if they go missing.

The most common uses for trackers are for keys, purses, wallets and even cellphones.

But if you're constantly misplacing your tv remote, try attaching a tracker to locate quicker.

Or, toss a tracker into your checked luggage so you can monitor when it's coming out of the luggage carousel.

Most mainstream bluetooth trackers are designed for locating children or pets since they're not meant to track moving items in real time.

But perhaps a tracker would be useful on a kids' jacket or lunchbox.

There are several brands of bluetooth trackers, but popular brands include tile, orbit, trackr and pixie.

Prices start as low as fifteen dollars for a tag.

For complete reviews visit cnet.com.

In san francisco, i'm kara tsuboi with cnet for cbs news.

The healing power of nature.

That story ahead on mid morning.

We'll be right back.

Nare ima nature is making a difference in the lives of those in the foster care system.

Nichelle medina has more on how one organization is using hiking to build life skills and self- confidence.

Imani smith is putting the emotional scars of her young life behind her with help from mother nature.

"i'm goin through a stage where i'm finding myself" the 20 year old was removed from her mother's care as a child and raised by a great aunt.

"i always fel like i was a loner in my own family" these days she's finding comraderie and a sense of family with "foster th earth" ...a international organization helping children and young adults from the foster care system..

Exposing them to the great outdoors.

"what their lif circumstances were growing up, whatever it be...doesn't define them" volunteers coordinate monthly hikes, training for a 45 mile summit to mount whitney.

The goal is to experience the challenges and healing power of nature, allowing participants like imani to find their place in the world.

"just tellin myself over and over that i can do it and not letting my body tell me that i can't" "it's hard o your body you're sore, you're tired all of those and they're just working through it and they're finding that strength within."

Along with hiking, imani has found thrilling adventures along the way... recently taking a wild ride down a waterfall.

"now, its like i' coming into myself and developing more as a person,overall" step by step that journey to self discovery has paid off.

Enrolled in college, imani has dreams of becoming a doctor.

A future that's bright in part to her deepened connection with nature... and new experiences that will last a lifetime.

Nichelle medina, cbs news, mount laguna, california.

"foster th earth" ha chapters in california, montana and chile.

To learn more about the organization go to www dot foster the earth dot org.

The holiday shopping season may seem like months away, but toy makers, distributors and especially social media influencers are picking their favorite toys now.

Diane king hall attended a popular toy event in new york city to get a sense of the hottest items hitting stores this fall.

A parent's worst nightmare... pop pops snotz is expected to be a áhitá this year.

But if you're not into splattering slime, the sweet suite toy event in new york city offered plenty of alternatives.

We found baby shark, juno dolls, a new high-tech pictionary and the pj masks.

There's also a growing number of toys straight from youtube influencers themselves&like ryan toys review.

The second grader has over 20 million subscribers who've been watching him unbox and play with toys for years.

3:53:51 "kids ar really plugged into youtube, that's where they're getting their content, that's where we want to make sure you can see all of these amazing toys as well."

Another youtuber...the tic toc toy family is launching toys for the first time this year.

The family produces skits for nearly 3 million subscribers.

"these are xox friends, there are 24 baby animals you can collect."

Not all influencers have products to peddle.

11-year old lindalee rose has been coming to events like this since she was four, reviewing toys for her youtube channel.

03:38:46 "do you classmates know you're on youtube and how to they react to that.

Yes, they know and they ask, oh are you famous?

I'm like, ehhh, kind of."

Then the junior reporter..

Had a few question of her own.

"have you ha any of the food here?

I haven't, i want to!"

The brands hope this interactive toy preview..

Will influence the influencers..

And help drive holiday sales.

Diane king hall, cbs news, new york.

When we return, one man explains how his company can make bad business reviews disappear.

But is that legal?

The story next on mid morning.

Goling googling yourself may be easy, but changing what google áfindsá about you is nearly impossible.

It's so difficult that many small businesses pay tens and even hundreds of thousands of dollars to get rid of negative comments.

The companies that do this are known as reputation management companies.

Jim axelrod has the investigation into this growing online industry.

1.

John rooney // web savvy llc time: ;18 - ;22 2: eugene volokh // ucla school of law professor time: 1:15 - 1:20 3.

Aftab pureval // hamilton county clerk of courts time: 2:35 - 2:39 i'm here to tell you what i could do for you is bury it and hide it.

What you're watching is a meeting with hidden cameras cbs news producers set up with john rooney, who runs web savvy, llc, one of those reputation management firms that buries bad reviews online.

Look, when it comes to this kind of suppression, quote unquote hiding, pushing down work, it is dependent on a number of factors, a lot of which depends on google.

ááá reputation management companies like these legally try to trick google by flooding the internet with positive content about their clients, forcing negative links down to google's second and third pages, where almost nobody looks.

But that's not foolproof, so john rooney told us that some companies employ other shadowy tactics.

Are there tricky ways to do it?

Kinda grey areas, if you will, yeah.

I wouldn't risk it.

I've seen it done.

One of the only ways to get google to permanently remove a link from its search results is with a court order from a judge.

We sorted through thousands of these court orders and spotted small businesses from all across america trying to clean up their reputations.

But we spotted a problem: dozens of the court documents were fake.

It never even crossed my mind that people would have the guts to actually go out there and just forge a court document.

As eugene volokh a ucla law professor points out: forging a court document is criminal.

Part of it is just how brazen it is.

Judge's signature and they copy it from one order to another order and they pretend something is a court order.

// it's cheaper and it's faster // if they don't get caught.

We worked with volokh and identified more than á60á fraudulent court orders sent to google.

Some are obviously fake, like this one, with a case number of "1-2-3 4-5-6-7-8-9."

Other are more sophisticated, like these that appear to be drawn from nine different federal courts across the country.

If someone says, "i'm advertisin guaranteed removal service," and i'v seen that advertised, you should be suspicious.

It's not just about making a bad review of your local restaurant disappear - we uncovered bogus court documents submitted on behalf of two convicted criminals who wanted google to forget about their crimes.

Both were child sex offenders.

Of the more than 60 phony documents, we found that 11 had signatures forged from judges in, of all places,hamilton county, ohio.

Some of them were pretty good forgeries frankly and some of them were utterly terrible forgeries.

After we brought the documents to aftab pureval, the court clerk, his office launched an investigation.

It's absolutely criminal.

One of those fake ohio documents was submitted for a client who hired web savvy, llc, the company run by& john rooney.

That's why we invited him to meet us with our hidden cameras rolling& my name is jim axelrod and i'm with cbs news.

// i wanted to ask you a question about this contract you have // you recognize the name of the client?

I certainly do.

This appears to be a court order.

// same name of the client.

// one problem, john, this is fake.

It's fraudulent, it's phony.

Can you explain it to me?

I didn't file that.

I've never seen it before.

Is this the technique you have ever used?

No.

I'm trying to figure out how the same links that are in this contract that you were paid $7,500 to remove end up in a fake court order with the client's name?

And i'm telling you, i don't know the answer to that question.

Axelrod: you understand how this looks...right?

Rooney: i do.

I appreciate your time, but there's nothing else to discuss.

Hiy storin history in pictures.

That story next on mid a easu t a treasure trove of images chronicling seven decades of black history have a new home.

More than four million prints and negatives from ebony and jet magazines were bought by a group of foundations this week for 30 ámillioná dollars.

The photos will be donated to museums, including the smithsonian.

Some images captured the stark reality of the black experience in america, and we want to warn you, some of them may be disturbing.

Adriana diaz got access to this historic archive.

The images are 70 years of american history.

Immortalized onto glossy paper, mostly in black and white.

This pulitzer prize winning photo of martin luther king's wife and daughter at his funeral... muhammad ali stinging like a bee... and a crooning james brown.

The images humanized celebrities... and celebrated regular people.

The core of this collection is our history.

It's the essence of the black story in america.

// perri irmer is president of chicago's dusable museum of african american history.

Did you grow up reading ebony magazine?

I sure did!

I sure did.

// you'd be hard pressed to walk into a black home back in the day and not see the current issue of ebony or jet magazine but decreasing subscriptions and rising debt, forced johnson publishing to sell the magazines and put its prized photo archives up for auction.

What do we have here?

Here we have muhammed ali... archivist vickie wilson gave us rare access to the files... ..no fingerprints allowed.

Just look at ray charlesplaying dominoes - where can you find an image like that?

We have the freedom riders... some photos were a catalyst for change.

When jet published the disturbing open casket image of14-year old emmett till who was beaten and lynched in 1955, it sparked the civil árightsá movement.

Rosa parks said she was thinking of átillá when she refused to give up her seat.

These are images wilson wants shared with future generations.

Why is it important to have this record?

// just to let them know, show how far we have comeááá// there's hope in these boxes a lot of hopeá hope, and history, preserved in time& heading to a new home.

Adriana diaz chicago.

Sometimes being a janitor is a thankless job.

But not for an alabama man who has made a big impression on the school he cleans and his community.

So much so -- he's on the receiving end of a big gift.

Bryan henry reports.

The surprise set-up was perfect and it paid off.

Kinnie morris walked in the lobby at jim pearson elementary school bewildered.

He was clueless on what the commotion was all about..

Nats ..

Until ellen price revealed the real surprise.

Ellen price/ teacher: "we got together to get you new car."

A new, used car is on the way to replace the old clunker morris is driving now.

The reason behind it all is the school found out kinnie morris was having trouble making doctor appointments and sometimes to work.

Ellen price/ teacher: "this school truly would no run as efficiently or as much fun without kinnie."

Kinnie morris/ custodian who received car: "i was completely shocke because i didn't know... i thought it was for somebody else."

All the more reason to repay morris for his loyalty to the school for 24 years.

Morris has been sweeping his way in the hearts of countless children who have come and gone.

Kinnie morris/ custodian who received car: "they don't forget me, i don' forget them.

Some of them i give them nicknames."

Nats "he's very funny sweet crazy.

Bryan henry/ reporting: "kinnie morris even had nickname for his own vehicle 'white lightning' or it used to be.

After all it has close to two hundred and ninety five thousand miles on it."

"are you surprised it laste this long?"

Kinnie morris/ custodian who received car: "yes sir.

Time to trade in the old and roll in the new set of wheels before long.

But there is no trading an original in kinnie morris.

Nats one of a kind beloved and cherished at jim pearson elementary.

In alex city bryan henry wsfa 12 news.

The school's gofundme account has raised around 7- thousand dollars so far.

If you would like to help, search for 'a car for kinnie."

We'll be right back th andor that and more on the next midmorning.

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